Speech

I’m pleased to welcome you today to Waitangi, the recognised birthplace of Aotearoa New Zealand, where in just a few days we will be acknowledging 180 years of treaty partnership between the indigenous Maori inhabitants and the British settlers who arrived here.

Speech

I begin by acknowledging all the hard work that has gone into Ruapekapeka 175 by the Trust and by Ngāti Manu, Te Ka potai, Ngāti Hau and Ngāti Hine.

Speech

Kia orana tatou katoatoa; Malo e lelei, Fakalofa lahi atu, Talofa, Malo ni, Talofa ni, Mauri, Ni sa bula vinaka, Noia, Warm Pacific greetings to you all, tena koutou, tena koutou, tena koutou katoa.

Speech

It is a great pleasure to be here this afternoon to celebrate such an historic occasion - the entry into force of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

Speech

The Royal Commission of Inquiry into the Terror Attack in Christchurch on March 15 has delivered a comprehensive report that will form the basis of a significant work programme to make New Zealand a safer and ultimately I hope, a more cohesive country.

Speech

Thank you for the opportunity to speak today. I want to recognise the hard work of the University of Auckland’s Public Policy Institute in putting on this event.

Speech

Kei aku rangatira no ngātapito e whā o te ao huri noa, tātou e huihui mai nei. Tēnā rā kōutou katoa.

Speech

One of the greatest opportunities to improve the wellbeing of New Zealanders is to reduce New Zealand’s high rates of violence and ultimately to reduce and stop family violence

Speech

E aku hoa i te ara o te whai,

Kia kotahi tā tātou takahi i te kō, ko tōku whiwhi kei tō koutou tautoko mai.

Ko tāku ki a koutou, hei whakapiki manawa mōku.

Speech

First, I want to express my thanks to Te Taumata for this hui and for all the fantastic work you are doing for Māori in the trade space.