Clean energy upgrade for more public buildings

More public buildings will be supported by the Government to upgrade to run on clean energy, the Minister for Climate Change James Shaw announced today.

Minister Shaw announced that Lincoln and Auckland universities will receive support through the Clean-Powered Public Service Fund to replace fossil fuel boilers. Southern, Taranaki, and Counties Manukau District Health Boards will also receive support to cut their emissions.

Together, these projects will reduce carbon emissions by around 48,250 tonnes over the next ten years, equivalent to taking 1,985 cars off the road.

“Climate change, for a lot of young people today, is not just another subject; it is the lens through which they see their future. What I am announcing today will mean that more of the places people go to study, now and in the future, will be part of the solution to the climate crisis.

“Previous Governments failed to do anything about the fact that a significant part of our public service has to use climate-polluting fossil fuels like coal to keep people warm

“Today’s announcement is another step towards changing this and ensuring climate-friendly energy solutions are a part of our everyday lives. It is about making the small but necessary changes that together add up to a better, cleaner future for Aotearoa New Zealand,” James Shaw said.

The projects are the latest to be announced under the $200 million clean-powered public service fund, which is part of the Government’s New Zealand Upgrade.

“The projects I am announcing today are a reflection of the choice we have made to pass on to our children and grandchildren a world that is better for what we did.

“In the nine months since I announced it, the Clean Powered Public Service Fund has been put to work supporting schools, hospitals, and other public organisations to make the switch to clean energy. 

“So far we have announced clean energy upgrades at 26 schools, four universities, and seven hospitals. We are also supporting Parliamentary Services to install solar PV and LED lighting, so that Parliament leads by example.

“This is all part of the work our Government has been doing over the last three years to bend the curve of our emissions downwards, something that has never happened before in New Zealand,” James Shaw said.

Further information

The projects announced today are:

  • Up to $4.576 million for Lincoln University to replace its large coal boiler with a low emissions alternative. Lincoln University will provide $6.864 million from its own budget for the clean energy upgrade. The upgrade is estimated to cut the university’s carbon emissions by around 45,500 tonnes over the next ten years
  • $0.250 million for Auckland University to replace a gas boiler with a low emissions alternative. Auckland University will provide $0.375 million from its own budget for the clean energy upgrade. The upgrade is estimated to cut the university’s carbon emissions by around 530 tonnes over the next ten years
  • $0.320 million for Southern DHB to replace a chiller at Kew Hospital in Invercargill with a low emissions alternative. Southern DHB will provide $0.480 million from its own budget. The upgrade is estimated to cut carbon emissions by around 1,500 tonnes over the next ten years
  • $0.200 million for Taranaki DHB to improve the energy efficiency of Taranaki Base Hospital. Taranaki DHB will provide $0.760 million from its own budget. The upgrade is estimated to cut carbon emissions by around 300 tonnes over the next ten years
  • $0.147 million for Countries Manukau DHB to install LED lighting at Middlemore Hospital. Countries Manukau DHB will provide $0.220 million from its own budget. The upgrade is estimated to cut carbon emissions by around 420 tonnes over the next ten years